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2014-05-14

7:30PM

n/a

This is a FREE promotional show to celebrate Judith Owen's new album Ebb & Flow. If you would like to attend the show please e-mail your full name, phone number and the number of guests who will be attending (limit of 4 guests per one name) to the Regattabar Manager Konrad Hess at KonradHess@charleshotel.com.

Judith Owen - FREE SHOW

This is a FREE promotional show to celebrate Judith Owen's new album Ebb & Flow. If you would like to attend the show please e-mail your full name, phone number and the number of guests who will be attending (limit of 4 guests per one name) to the Regattabar Manager Konrad Hess at KonradHess@charleshotel.com.

JUDITH OWEN BIO:
That Judith Owen's new album Ebb and Flow evokes the spirit of the halcyon days of the great 1970s troubadours is not accidental.

In a set of potent songs about love and loss, pain and joy, dreams and despair, the Welsh singer-songwriter fearlessly explores the duality of the human condition - and to do justice to the songs she turned to the legendary musicians who created the seventies troubadour sound. Between them, her core band of drummer Russ Kunkel, bassist Lee Sklar and guitarist Waddy Wachtel played on many of the landmark albums from the era by the likes of Carole King, James Taylor, Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne.

The three musicians who "created the sound of the 1970s" (Rolling Stone) were always the band Owen wanted to work with. "I fell in love with them; that soothing sound and the consummate side-men who helped create it," says Owen. David Crosby described them simply as "the best." With Ebb and Flow, they recorded together for the first time in fifteen years.

Although Ebb and Flow is a highly personal, solo singer-songwriter album, in a real sense it's a 'band' record, too. "One of the great things is that Judith makes space for what we add," Kunkel notes. "She turned it into a real ensemble thing," Wachtel adds.

There is a seductive wit and playfulness alongside the introspection, too. A trademark of Owen's career has been her irreverent ability to subvert well-known songs with unexpected and improbable covers. Over the years she has turned-inside-out songs by the likes of Deep Purple and The Police to render them almost unrecognisable from the originals. Here it's Mungo Jerry's 1970 smash hit "In The Summertime" that gets the unique Owen makeover treatment, rendered as it might have sounded if the song had appeared on Joni Mitchell's Ladies of The Canyon. "Great songs are like great bones. You can hang whatever you want on them," she says. " "In The Summertime" is a ridiculously silly song, and so I asked 'What Would Joni Do?' It's warm, with a glint in the eye and a sense of fun."

The result is the most confident and assured album of Owen's career to date. After emigrating to America in 1993, Ebb and Flow is Judith Owen's eighth album since her 1996 debut Emotions On A Postcard.. Married to the actor and humorist Harry Shearer, in addition to her acclaimed solo work she has for many years been Richard Thompson's female foil of choice. Both have appeared on each other's albums and Owen played a leading collaborative part in Thompson's projects 1000 Years Of Popular Music and Cabaret of Souls.. She also co-created “Losing It” with Ruby Wax, a funny yet devastatingly honest two-woman show chronicling descent into mental illness that was a box-office hit in London's West End in 2011.

But it is her role as an unflinching singer-songwriter baring her soul that remains at the core of Owen's creativity. Ebb and Flow, she says, feels like a homecoming. "It's the sound I heard as a kid and which made me light up. I've brought it home and it feels nice to be here."

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